Travel information – Vermont Travel Guides http://vermonttravelguides.com/ Sun, 31 Jul 2022 03:49:44 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://vermonttravelguides.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/cropped-icon-32x32.png Travel information – Vermont Travel Guides http://vermonttravelguides.com/ 32 32 Saint-Émilion travel information and guide https://vermonttravelguides.com/saint-emilion-travel-information-and-guide/ Wed, 06 Jul 2022 16:45:19 +0000 https://vermonttravelguides.com/saint-emilion-travel-information-and-guide/ In 1999, UNESCO designated St-Émilion as a World Heritage Site for being “an outstanding example of a historic wine-growing landscape which has survived intact and in operation to the present day”. Installed in a natural amphitheater, softened by the color of the old piano keys, this city of Dordogne has regained its beauty of yesteryear. […]]]>

In 1999, UNESCO designated St-Émilion as a World Heritage Site for being “an outstanding example of a historic wine-growing landscape which has survived intact and in operation to the present day”. Installed in a natural amphitheater, softened by the color of the old piano keys, this city of Dordogne has regained its beauty of yesteryear. But leave your high heels at home: the ways called mounds, unevenly paved with blocks of Cornish granite (the ballast of English wine ships), are so steep that handrails have been installed in their center.

However, St-Émilion keeps its greatest secrets underground – not only the ruby ​​nectar in its cellars, loved by medieval popes and English kings, but the largest underground church in Europe. Ideally arrive early to avoid the crowds of day trippers or stay overnight.

To see and do in St-Emilion

Entering the city from the south on the D122, you will pass a public park built around the Gaudet House, home of the Girondin deputy Marguerite-Élie Guadet, who managed to flee the executions of Robespierre in Paris with seven other Girondins. They hid for nine months in St-Émilion, but all but one were eventually captured by Robespierre’s henchmen and guillotined – ironically, just days before 9 Thermidor, when Robespierre himself had the chop. On the other side of the road, rising abruptly from a vineyard, the Great Walls, a 20 m wall with ogival arches, is all that remains of a Dominican monastery built in 1287; as he was outside the walls, he was easy prey for a marauding French army in 1337.

The Great Walls are all that remains of a Dominican monastery built in 1287 © JLPC, Wikimedia Commons

Just beyond is the main entrance to St-Émilion, the Place Leclerc. Take the first left to see the substantial remains of the ancient lavish Cardinal Palacebuilt in 1316 by the Cardinal de Ste-Luce, nephew of Pope Clement V. Continue to Rue Gaudet, where just beyond the Place du Chapitre, the Dominicans have rebuilt their Jacobin Convent, after a donation in 1378 by the English lieutenant of Aquitaine, Jean de Neville. Until the Revolution, this church housed the town’s main place of pilgrimage: a statue of St Valéry, patron saint of the winegrowers of St-Émilion (today in the Collegiate Church). Brides gently wiped the statue with their handkerchiefs wishing to become pregnant; Valery’s exact role in the affair was the cause of many jokes.

Higher up, at the fork, take rue des Cordeliers for the Commanderya former Templar outpost (now a hotel) and the Cloister of the Cordeliers, built in 1383. The pretty 14th-century twin-column Franciscan cloister is a peaceful place – and this being St-Émilion it is now used as a wine bar, while the old church is a huge wine and wine shop. gifts. 20m below, an astonishing termite mound with 3km of galleries, where since 1892 the sparkling and slightly mellow Crémant de Bordeaux has been aged, invented by a Mr. Meynot, when wine sales were collapsing. Book tours and tastings via the Cordeliers website, or take an electric tuk-tuk tour, which includes a surface visit to St-Émilion.

Shop St-Emilion Dordogne
There are a number of charming independent shops dotted around the center of St-Émilion © chris Lawrence travel, Shutterstock

Return to rue Gaudet and rue de la Cadène, which soon passes under the 16th century arch of the Door and the House of Cadène, “of the chain”, by which a street could be closed quickly in an emergency. Notice the half-timbered house on the left, decorated with a pair of grotesque heads and dolphins. Higher up, rue Gaudet joins Market placea magnificent urban setting built on the first cemetery of the city, its cafes shaded by a Tree of Liberty planted during the Revolution of 1848.

Trip to Saint-Emilion

St-Émilion station, on the TER Bordeaux-Sarlat line, is 2 km away, but from April to October you can book a tuk-tuk shuttle to pick you up. Buses 314 and 315 run all year round from Libourne station to St-Émilion; in summer the 302 bus connects Bordeaux directly to St-Émilion via Libourne.

The beautiful vineyards and lanes around St-Émilion make for a fun bike ride; rent one at the tourist office or at Bicyclettes de Saint-Émilion. There is free parking at Police station parking lot and paying car parks closer to the center by the Collegiate Church and Place Bouqueyre.

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Toulouse travel information and guide https://vermonttravelguides.com/toulouse-travel-information-and-guide/ Tue, 05 Jul 2022 12:56:57 +0000 https://vermonttravelguides.com/toulouse-travel-information-and-guide/ What keeps this region from dozing in its vats of duck fat and wine is that big pink dynamo on the Garonne. Toulouse, nicknamed La Ville Rose for its millions of pink bricks, has 1,360,000 inhabitants, more than 110,000 university students, a well-preserved historic center with the largest Romanesque church in the world and most […]]]>

What keeps this region from dozing in its vats of duck fat and wine is that big pink dynamo on the Garonne. Toulouse, nicknamed La Ville Rose for its millions of pink bricks, has 1,360,000 inhabitants, more than 110,000 university students, a well-preserved historic center with the largest Romanesque church in the world and most of the aeronautical, space and related infrastructures of the EU. technological industries.

Instead of being France’s fourth city, Toulouse should have been the capital of an Occitan-speaking nation called Languedoc, but it was knocked out of the major leagues in the 1220s by the popes and kings of France and their sidekick. Simon deMontfort. Eight centuries later, Toulouse is rediscovering its mojo as the capital of Occitania, a large region stretching from the Dordogne to the Rhône, encompassing almost all the former territories of the former Counts of Toulouse.

Spain extends its course here, distilling enough passion to make Toulouse a city of emotion, emotion that overflows when his beloved rugby team, Stade Toulousain, enters the field. The city’s motto is By Tolosa totjorn May (“For Toulouse, always more”). Ever more sprawl and traffic jams, but also ever more things to see and do, showing off its air and space technology at the Cité d’Espace and Aeroscopia – as well as the nifty steampunk marvels to ride in the Halle de the machine.

To see and do in Toulouse

Capitol Square

Toulouse’s front saloon dates from 1850, after a 200-year campaign to rid it of surplus buildings. As a permanent memorial to the southern kingdom forever, the center of the pavement is marked by a huge Cross of Languedoc, complete with Zodiac symbols added in 1993, by Raymond Moretti, who also decorated the ceilings of the porticos of the square with scenes from the city’s history. This same golden cross on a red background is proudly hung on the town hall of Toulouse, the CapitolWhere Capitol as it reads on the facade, bowing to a 16th-century story claiming that ancient Rome got its idea of ​​the Capitol from the Toulouse temple of Jupiter Capitolinus.

The Théâtre du Capitole is even more impressive at night © Jean-Pierre Dalbéra, Wikimedia Commons

The portal on the right belongs to the Capitol Theater, while above the central door eight pink marble columns represent the eight Capitouls. Pedestrians can cut through the magnificent walkway to the interior Henry IV Court, with a statue of the said king, who in 1602 gave permission for the construction of the court. Henry would have said Nope! if he had known what was going to happen there 30 years later, thanks to the jealous rivalries and shenanigans of his two neurotic sons, Louis XIII and Gaston d’Orléans (“Monsieur” for short), and the Prime Minister and arch-puppeteer Cardinal de Richelieu.

The grand the staircase leads to the lovely public rooms, decorated between the middle of the 19th century and until the 1920s with monumental illustrations from picture books on the history of Toulouse. The vast Hall of the Illustrious is lined with paintings of Toulouse’s moments of glory, including the prodigious Pope Urban II entered Toulouse in 1095 to summon Raymond IV to the First Crusade by Benjamin Constant and the Victory over Simon de Montfort by Laurens, with the Apotheosis of the woman who killed Simon de Montfort on the ceiling, honoring the anonymous heroine of the city.

Augustinian Museum

Housed in a 14th century Augustinian convent, this art treasure chest owes its foundation to Alexandre Dumège, the self-taught son of a Dutch actor passionate about medieval art. During the Revolution, while the Ville Rose was busy blithely smashing its fabulous architectural heritage as ordered in 1790 by the Convention, “so as not to allow any monument evoking slavery to remain”, Dumège alone and by defiance saved the essential of the contents of this museum, then opened its doors in 1794.

Augustinian Museum Toulouse
The Musée des Augustins is housed in a 14th century convent © Didier Descouens, Wikimedia Commons

The Romanesque and Gothic sculptures, in particular the capitals of cloisters that have disappeared, steal the show. The finest come from St-Étienne – a delicate, almost fluid scene of the dance of Salomé and the beheading of Jean-Baptiste. There are scenes from a 14th century altarpiece, the Group of three people, one of whom is strangled by a monster, and a singing chorus of gargoyles; there is a sarcophagus with a webbed-footed bird carved on the side, believed to belong to the Visigoth Queen Ranachilde – Queen Pedauque, the crow’s feet, which was said to paddle around Toulouse in the aqueducts. There are reliefs by Nicolas Bachelier, and portraits by Capitouls; one of their oldest prerogatives was image rights – the right to have their portraits painted, a rare honor in the 13th and 14th centuries. There is a very unpleasant Apollo flaying Marsyas by Guido Reni, and the paintings are by Van Dyck, Rubens, Murillo, Rigaud, Simon Vouet, Delacroix, Ingres, Manet, Morisot, Vuillard, Maurice Denis and Toulouse-Lautrec.

The Jacobins

Just west of Place du Capitole stands the grand Dominican Mother Church, Les Jacobins, one of the masterpieces of French Southern Gothic. The Spanish priest Domingo de Guzmán or Dominic had attempted to convert the Cathars before the Albigensian Crusade, though even a holy man’s powers of persuasion proved negligible in the face of an intellectual revolt against the openly corrupt clergy. By 1206 Domingo had converted enough women to found a convent, which became the germ of his Order of Preachers, established in Toulouse in 1215. Confirmed by the Pope in 1216, the new Dominican order quickly found adherents across the Europe.

The Jacobins of Toulouse
Les Jacobins is one of the masterpieces of Southern Gothic © Pom², Wikimedia Commons

The church is the perfect expression of the 13th century reaction to Rome’s love of luxury. The gargoyles are the only exterior sculpture of this immense but harmonious cluster of brick buttresses, alternating with flamboyant windows; its octagonal bell tower in brick and stone crowned with small towers is a landmark of the Toulouse skyline. The interior is breathtakingly light and spacious, consisting of twin naves divided by seven enormous columns, 28m the tallest of any Gothic church anywhere, criss-crossed by a fantastic interweaving of ribs in the vault, reaching an epiphany in the massive Flamboyant palm in the apse. The painted decoration dates from the 13th to 16th centuries, but only the glass of the rose windows on the west side is original. The 19th century gilded reliquary of Saint Thomas Aquinas was returned to the high altar in 1974.

Hotel de Bernuy

It was one of the most beautiful residences in the city, built in 1504 by a merchant of pastels from Burgos, Don Juan de Bernuy, a Spanish Jew who became a citizen – and Capitoul – of Toulouse. Although Gothic on the outside, architect Loys Privat designed an eclectic courtyard, a mix of Gothic, Plateresque and Loire Chateau, topped with a tall tower rivaling those of any other pastel moguls. De Bernuy had a chance to repay France for the fortune he made when Francis I was captured at the Battle of Pavia by Charles V and imprisoned in Madrid; the king fell seriously ill, but no one could pay the ransom of 1,200,000 gold coins shield demanded by the Emperor – until de Bernuy bailed him out.

In his distress the king had promised an ex-voto to Saint Sernin if he survived, and in the ambulatory you can see the black marble statue he donated when he came in 1533 to thank Saint and Bernuy. Shortly after Bernuy’s time, the Jesuits took over his mansion and turned it into a college, now the prestigious Pierre de Fermat high schoolnamed after his star student.

Basilica of Saint-Sernin

Sernin’s tomb at Notre-Dame-du-Taur attracted so many pilgrims and Christians wishing to be buried near it that in 403 AD a martyrium was built 300m to the north. The saint’s remains were moved here; Charlemagne, who always seemed to travel with a trunk of sacred bones, donated a heap, and it was not long before graves lined the Rue du Taur. In 1075, as the pilgrimage to Compostela gained momentum, the canons of Saint-Sernin decided they needed something much bigger to cope with the pious crowds. The construction of a new basilica was of such importance that in 1096 Pope Urban II consecrated its marble altar while recruiting Count Raymond IV as leader of the First Crusade.

Basilica of Saint Sernin Toulouse
St-Sernin is the largest surviving Romanesque church in the world © Didier Descouens, Wikimedia Commons

In 1220, St-Sernin was completed. 115m long, with a 46m transept, it is the largest surviving Romanesque church in the world (only Cluny, destroyed during the Revolution, was larger). Started at the same time, it takes up the plan of the basilica of Santiago de Compostela, intended to welcome the crowds of pilgrims: a cross, ending in a majestic semi-circular apse with five radiating chapels. In the 19th century, the abbey and the cloister were demolished and in 1860, Viollet-le-Duc was called upon to restore the basilica. He spent 20 years on the project – and botched the roof so badly that a century later it was in danger of collapsing, hence an expensive ‘de-restoration’ project to undo the misdeeds of Viollet-le- Duke. Today it is a UNESCO World Heritage Site as part of the Camino de Santiago de Compostela.

Getting to Toulouse

By plane

Toulouse International Airport at Blagnac, 10 km northwest of the centre, is one of the busiest in France.

By train

Toulouse’s main train station is Matabiau. Trains from Paris-Austerlitz via Gourdon, Souillac, Cahors and Montauban take 6h30; The TGV from Paris-Montparnasse does the same in 5 hours – via Bordeaux. Slow trains to Bordeaux take 2.5 hours and stop at Montauban, Castelsarrasin, Moissac, Agen and Aiguillon.

By bus

La Gare Routière is next to the train station with buses mainly to towns around Toulouse. The low-cost European bus line Flixbus also uses the station.

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Perigueux travel information and guide https://vermonttravelguides.com/perigueux-travel-information-and-guide/ Tue, 05 Jul 2022 07:09:44 +0000 https://vermonttravelguides.com/perigueux-travel-information-and-guide/ Located in a privileged and fertile valley on the Isle river, the capital of the Dordogne department is a cheerful city of 31,600 inhabitants which prints all the postage stamps of France. The old streets around its famous five-domed cathedral have been cleverly restored to give the city a lively and charming heart. Another plus […]]]>

Located in a privileged and fertile valley on the Isle river, the capital of the Dordogne department is a cheerful city of 31,600 inhabitants which prints all the postage stamps of France. The old streets around its famous five-domed cathedral have been cleverly restored to give the city a lively and charming heart. Another plus is two excellent museums, old and new, offering a chance to experience what life was like here in the days of Asterix.

To see and do in Perigueux

St-Front Cathedral

It is the fourth church built here, at the top of the Puy above the island. A 6th century AD chapel containing the relics of St Front was replaced in 1074 by a much larger church, to attract pilgrims on the Camino de Santiago. In 1120, when this new church burned down, it was decided to build something extraordinary with five domes on a Greek cross, similar to Saint Mark in Venice. In the 19th century, this marvel was a rickety disaster waiting to happen. After the Huguenots damaged it in 1575 and destroyed the tomb of St Front, a series of thoughtless restorations exacerbated the typical problems of old age.

The St-Front Cathedral stands at the top of the Puy sur l’Isle © Hubpliss, Wikimedia Commons

Of Place de la Clautre you can see what remains of the church from 1074: the austere facade fitted with the strange Roman fragment, the side walls which now form an open courtyard, the lower two thirds of the 57m square bell tower, built in a unique style for the Middle Ages which may have inspired Abadie’s eccentricity. There are two confessions (tombs of the holy confessors) – one under the bell tower and the other under the western dome – and the small cloister with a “pine cone” in its center, a copy of a common Roman motif ( the famous Vatican in a courtyard), which originally surmounted the bell tower.

Medieval streets around St-Front

The north door of the cathedral opens onto Avenue Daumesnil, the center of a fascinating network of pedestrian streets from the 15th and 16th centuries. Much of the stone in their townhouses was quarried from ancient Vesunna, and residents often leave their doors open to let passers-by admire their curving interior staircases. The Old Mill, perched on a river wall on Boulevard Georges Saumande, is a vestige of the grain monopoly once held by the canons of St-Front. Just down the street, the 15th century House of the Consuls, the former seat of the city’s government, reflects the golden age of the late Middle Ages and the Renaissance in Périgueux; there are fine views of the set on the willow banks of the Isle from the Barris Bridge.

Medieval ramparts of Périgueux
The streets of Périgueux are a treasure of medieval architecture © jdelphotos, Shutterstock

Go up to Place Daumesnil, enter the picturesque Daumesnil Galleries via rue de la Clarté: this is a set of old courtyards open to the public, and named after Pierre Daumesnil, born at 7 rue de la Clarté in 1776. Long narrow pedestrian path Limoges Street has been the busiest shopping street in Périgueux since the Middle Ages and is lined with Renaissance houses; nope. 5, the House Estignardis particularly charming with its skylights, its mullioned windows and its sculptures of salamanders, a way of flattering François Ier of whom they were the emblem.

In pretty St. Louis Square surrounded by restaurants and cafes, the Pastry Chef’s House (1518) has a carved porch and an inscription warning that anyone who speaks ill behind people’s backs is not welcome inside, for “the greatest glory is to displease the wicked”.

Museum of Art and Archeology of Périgord (MAAP)

This museum has something for everyone. The important prehistoric section has one of the oldest complete skeletons ever discovered, Neanderthal man dating from 70,000 BC. Regourdou’s man. There are Upper Paleolithic carvings and carvings in bone and stone, among them the strange, disembodied Bison Parade of Chancelade and a disc sculpted with hinds.

Millennia later, there are Gallo-Roman jewelry, domestic objects and mosaics, an Alemannic sword, Visigothic and Frankish blades, a Visigothic sarcophagus from the 6th century, a fragment of lacework from a Carolingian choir, and strange faces and messy sirens that once adorned St-Front, a jewelry box that belonged to the Fénelon family, and ceramics and enamels from Limoges.

The paintings are not overwhelming, but there is the Rabastens Diptych (1286), a rare work painted on Toulouse leather, a Canaletto and Dutch works, and works by Périgourdins from the 20th century, including sculptures by Jane Poupelet. Much of the ethnographic collection (from New Caledonia, the Cook Islands, Papua New Guinea and Africa) was brought back by Admiral Bougainville, who sailed around the world in 1768 for King Louis XV and introduced Europe to the flowers that bear his name, along with masks, idols and other art objects, including a 5m shell necklace used as currency.

Vesone Tower

According to ancient writers, this fantastic ruin once stood in the exact center of Vesunna, in the middle of a peristyle square. It was the temple of the city’s patron deity, a dark Celtic goddess who did not like to be named. Today it stands alone in a park, an enigmatic cylinder of stone and brick 20 m high, with its breach attributed to St Front. Imagine this large cylinder as it must have appeared in the Middle Ages, still surrounded by some of its columns.

Note the row of sockets about 6m from the top; beams projected from here to support the cornice and the roof, which would have been domed or conical – recalled in the unique and strange circular lantern at the top of the steeple of St-Front. This is the very image of the Tour de Vésone; this emblematic, almost magical building was still to keep Périgueux under its spell, and the Romanesque builders were finally able to seize it and convert it to Christianity.

Saint-Etienne-de-la-Cite

The center of the old city is marked by the oldest church in Périgueux, founded on a Temple of Mars in the 6th century. In the 12th century it was rebuilt in a style which became the prototype of the domed Perigordian Romanesque church, with large Byzantine cupolas not only over the crossing but also along the entire length of the nave. Originally, St-Étienne had four, culminating in a huge bell tower-porch; these busy Huguenots, unkindly, and not too cleanly, ripped off the front half.

The two remaining bays are not only an important lesson in the origins of Perigord Romanesque art, but are imbued with a dark medieval solemnity, an atmosphere so absent in St-Front. The first dome, from the early 1100s, is solid and primitive, lit only by tiny windows; the second, around 1160, is elongated, lighter and supported by twin columns.

Inside, the arch of the tomb of Bishop Jean d’Asside (d1169) frames the Romanesque baptismal font and a medieval curiosity: a sculpted Easter calendar from the 12th century. In the days of slow communications, each diocese had to determine the correct Easter Sunday by observing the moon and calculating from a chart like this.

Trip to Perigueux

The station (11 rue Denis Papin) is on the TER from Bordeaux to Limoges, via Mussidan and Montpon-Ménestérol and Libourne. It’s 4h30-5h from Paris (change in Limoges), or generally faster by the LGV to Libourne then the TER.

Another option is bus 01 connecting Périgueux (via Brantôme) to Angoulême, to join the LGV Paris-Bordeaux there. Another TER line connects Périgueux to Agen via Les Eyzes, Sarlat, Villefranche-de-Périgord and Monsempron-Libos (where you can take the bus to Cahors).

Périgueux station is also the center of the Dordogne bus network with year-round buses to Riberac, Mareuil, Nontron, Excideuil, Salagnac, Montignac, Sarlat and Bergerac, as well as summer lines to Aubeterre-sur -Dronne, Les Eyzies, Domme and more.

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Utica 4th of July Weather, Parking and Travel Information https://vermonttravelguides.com/utica-4th-of-july-weather-parking-and-travel-information/ Fri, 01 Jul 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://vermonttravelguides.com/utica-4th-of-july-weather-parking-and-travel-information/ Whether you’re planning a road trip or prefer to catch the fireworks and 4th of July parade in Utica, here’s what you need to know this holiday weekend Expect a sunny 4th of July, but try to stay cool Friday is expected to be sunny in the Utica area, with temperatures reaching near 90 degrees […]]]>

Whether you’re planning a road trip or prefer to catch the fireworks and 4th of July parade in Utica, here’s what you need to know this holiday weekend

Expect a sunny 4th of July, but try to stay cool

Friday is expected to be sunny in the Utica area, with temperatures reaching near 90 degrees Fahrenheit, according to the National Weather Service. While thunderstorms followed by rain are expected from Friday evening to Saturday, Sunday and Monday are both expected to be sunny with highs around 80.

With high temperatures and sunny skies, staying cool and hydrated is a top priority. People most at risk of heat-related illnesses are infants and young children, people over 65, people who are overweight, people who overwork during work or exercise, and those who suffer from illnesses such as heart disease or who take certain medications, according to the CDC, which advises the following:

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Travel Information | NAACP https://vermonttravelguides.com/travel-information-naacp/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 18:18:01 +0000 https://vermonttravelguides.com/travel-information-naacp/ Atlantic City International Airport (ACY)*Egg Harbor Township, NJ 08234Airport Information: (609) 645-7895Located 25 minutes from the congress hotels (free shuttle offered) *If you are traveling by plane and wish to fly directly to Atlantic City, SPIRIT Airlines is the only airline available to do so. Other major airlines will serve PHL. Philadelphia International Airport (PHL) […]]]> ]]> Free Travel Information – Texas Highways https://vermonttravelguides.com/free-travel-information-texas-highways/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 14:09:50 +0000 https://vermonttravelguides.com/free-travel-information-texas-highways/ Order free printed travel information Looking for even more resources to inspire you and plan your next trip? The Texas Highways The staff produces several high quality printed pieces that you will find essential for your explorations of Lone Star State. And best of all? Each piece is free on request! Simply go to Texas […]]]>

Order free printed travel information

Looking for even more resources to inspire you and plan your next trip? The Texas Highways The staff produces several high quality printed pieces that you will find essential for your explorations of Lone Star State. And best of all? Each piece is free on request!

Simply go to Texas Travel Leads to begin your order. Parts available include:

Texas State Travel Guide and Official Texas Travel Map

Published annually, the more than 250-page guide highlights publicly accessible sites in Texas of cultural, historical, and recreational interest and serves as the state’s premier enforcement publication. Over 500 cities are included with details on events, state parks, lakes, national parks and forests, wineries and scenic areas, and Texas travel information centers. The Official Texas Travel Map is designed to display the maximum amount of information relevant to travelers in the most readable manner. Highways and farm/ranch roads leading to highways, communities, and recreational areas are included, as are airports.

More information about the guide and map is available here.

Texas Highway Events Calendar

This quarterly publication features more than 1,000 listings of fairs, festivals, concerts, plays, exhibits, events and cultural celebrations across the state – the most comprehensive collection of event information in Texas.

More information on the calendar of events is available here.

Texas Public Campgrounds

Texas Public Campgrounds lists and provides details for 388 campgrounds operated by federal, state, and local government entities.

Texas: A Quick Overview (for teachers)

This 32-page booklet gives a brief history of Texas and introduces the state regionally, primarily with pictures. This is a broad overview of Texas, including facts and flags that have flown over the state. This piece is intended for school-aged children and is a product for teachers and children who request materials that will help them learn about Texas for school homework.

Texas Wildflowers Brochure

With photographs of many common Texas wildflowers, including seasons of appearance and where they grow.

For our travel and tourism industry partners

Our division operates an in-state literature distribution program designed specifically for hospitality centers, cities, chambers, CVBs, hotels, and entities that interact with travelers. Approved entities may order bulk quantities of the Texas State Travel Guide, Map, Texas Highways Events Calendar, and other publications.

To order free publications for your business for free distribution to the public, follow these steps:

  1. Go to https://texastravelleads.com/ttl_login
  2. Click on Register New User
  3. Once registered, TxDOT will configure you in the system to be able to order. You will receive a confirmation email once this is complete.

Questions or need help? Contact:

Lakena cooks
Auxiliary Publications Coordinator
[email protected]
512-486-5927

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Live at Leeds: In The Park 2022 travel information, shuttle and parking details https://vermonttravelguides.com/live-at-leeds-in-the-park-2022-travel-information-shuttle-and-parking-details/ Thu, 02 Jun 2022 12:54:44 +0000 https://vermonttravelguides.com/live-at-leeds-in-the-park-2022-travel-information-shuttle-and-parking-details/ Live at Leeds: In The Park will take place for the first time this weekend and we’ve got all the details to make sure you get to the Nesam Temple site smoothly. The Live at Leeds team kick off their new Temple Newsam event on Saturday 4th June. Among those featured are Bombay Bicycle Club, […]]]>

Live at Leeds: In The Park will take place for the first time this weekend and we’ve got all the details to make sure you get to the Nesam Temple site smoothly.

The Live at Leeds team kick off their new Temple Newsam event on Saturday 4th June. Among those featured are Bombay Bicycle Club, The Vaccines, Sports Team, Sea Girls, The Pigeon Detectives, Arlo Parks and Confidence Man.

We’ll bring you everything you need to know ahead of Live at Leeds: In The Park. We have published the details of the times set for the festival.

Read more: Live at Leeds: In The City announce October festival lineup

In this article, you will find all the information you need to get to and from Temple Newsam’s location. You will find details for arriving by car, details of the shuttle bus and the nearest train station to the festival site.

Scroll below and find the information you need. You can also tell us who you can’t wait to see at Live at Leeds: In The Park by commenting on this article.

Travel information

There are several ways to get to Live at Leeds: In The Park. The nearest station to the Temple Newsam site is Leeds station. From there, you can get to the festival in several ways. You will find the details below:

Shuttle bus

Live at Leeds: In The Park offers a shuttle service from Leeds city center directly to the festival site and vice versa. Pickup and drop off will be based in Sovereign Street. Trips to the site will take place between 11:30 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. with return visits later in the day. Single tickets are priced at £4 and returns are £8.

Car parking

You can drive to Live at Leeds and park. The options are located at a junction of the M1 and the A63. For the satnav location of the entrance, search for “Temple Newsam Park – Event Road”, then follow the yellow festival signage once you approach the site. No car should be left overnight. Parking tickets can be purchased in advance on the event website.

Taxis and drop-off points

There will be spaces for taxis and those dropped off by family and friends at the north entrance to the site. This is accessed via the public entrance on Temple Newsam Road via the A64.

Prohibited items

Tickets

If you want to go to Live at Leeds: In The Park, ticket information can be found on the team’s website.

For the latest news on big gigs and events in our city, you can visit our Best in Leeds homepage. You’ll also find a guide to the great things to do in Leeds.

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Huddersfield Town travel information for Wembley play-off final amid rail strike warning https://vermonttravelguides.com/huddersfield-town-travel-information-for-wembley-play-off-final-amid-rail-strike-warning/ Tue, 17 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://vermonttravelguides.com/huddersfield-town-travel-information-for-wembley-play-off-final-amid-rail-strike-warning/ Huddersfield Town fans will plan their trip in droves after their side reached the play-off final with a late victory over Luton Town on Monday night, setting up a Wembley encounter against Nottingham Forest or Sheffield United with a Premier League place on the line . on Sunday May 29. Trains will run regularly to […]]]>

Huddersfield Town fans will plan their trip in droves after their side reached the play-off final with a late victory over Luton Town on Monday night, setting up a Wembley encounter against Nottingham Forest or Sheffield United with a Premier League place on the line . on Sunday May 29.

Trains will run regularly to London on the same day, with those leaving Huddersfield facing changes at Leeds, Wakefield, York and Manchester Piccadilly. However, fans wishing to use the railways should be aware that industrial action by RMT drivers is planned on Transpennine Express services on the day of the final.

This should not affect services to London, but could impact services from Huddersfield to Leeds and Manchester Piccadilly. The National Rail website advises: “If you are planning to travel on a day affected by RMT strikes, you should check for updates until the last minute as services may be subject to changes at short notice. You should also allow extra time for journeys, as services will be much busier than normal.

Read more: Huddersfield Town’s impact players and the work ahead in five conclusions on the road to Wembley

It adds: ‘Please check closer to travel time for strike days from Sunday May 22 as travel planners do not yet reflect the reduced schedule.’

The last trains returning to Huddersfield via Manchester and Leeds depart from Euston station at 8.15pm and Kings Cross at 8.35pm respectively. The final is a 4.30pm kick-off and would finish around 6.30pm if the game were to be decided in normal times, but the extra time and penalties could make it difficult for fans to return to central London to bring their trains home with public transport taking a minimum of 36 minutes from Wembley on calm days. On the day of the final, it might take longer. There are however return trains to Leeds scheduled at 9.05pm, 9.35pm and 10.35pm, with the last trains to Manchester leaving at 9.25pm ​​and 9.51pm.

The cheapest return tickets currently available from Huddersfield to London are priced at £126. Alternatively, Huddersfield Town plans to run coach services from Huddersfield to Wembley and back within the day. Further details on this will be available in due course.

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North and Central Devon travel guide and information https://vermonttravelguides.com/north-and-central-devon-travel-guide-and-information/ Mon, 16 May 2022 20:13:37 +0000 https://vermonttravelguides.com/north-and-central-devon-travel-guide-and-information/ We want visitors from afar to know that there is more to Devon than the beaches and shops that appear in tourist brochures. Alistair & Gill Campbell authors of Slow Travel: North and Central Devonco-written by Hilary Bradt We have lived in the West Country for many years and one of the joys of finding […]]]>

We want visitors from afar to know that there is more to Devon than the beaches and shops that appear in tourist brochures.

Alistair & Gill Campbell authors of Slow Travel: North and Central Devonco-written by Hilary Bradt

We have lived in the West Country for many years and one of the joys of finding Bradt’s Slow Guide is that it has made us appreciate North and Central Devon again. Walk on the coastal paths under a radiant sun; discover tiny churches and little-known villages; learn to blow glass, throw a pot or ride a wave – north and central Devon are surprisingly rich in hidden delights.

North Devon is dominated by its coastline and some parts become very crowded in high season. Head a bit south into Mid Devon and the crowds evaporate. Here you’ll find interesting places to stay, from a cob thatched cottage in a quiet village to a luxurious treehouse with a hot tub for two. Some attractions are well known, like the RHS Gardens in Rosemoor, but others, like Dingles Heritage Fairground just off the A30 and Woolley Animals in Winkleigh, are off the usual beaten track.

This part of Devon is exceptionally attractive to foodies. Slow food is part of slow travel and this region lends itself well to time spent lingering over a meal in a thatched-roof pub, cream tea in a seaside tea room, a river or even a cocktail in front of a beach at sunset. Whatever you eat and drink is likely to be local thanks to the region’s agricultural heritage, which encourages free-range animals and organic methods. It’s likely that the gin for your cocktail will also come from a little further afield thanks to the growing number of distilleries springing up in the area. North and Mid Devon has fourteen independent breweries, numerous cider houses and a handful of small wineries.

Many visitors come to the area to walk around. We first visited to hike the famous South West Coast Path (SWCP); the North Devon section is probably the most beautiful (as well as the most difficult) part of the whole route. All keen walkers visiting Devon will hike parts of the Coastal Path, with most using the inland paths to make a circular trip or taking a local bus to the start.

As you walk or drive, you’re sure to spot wildlife – red deer, Exmoor ponies, foxes, badgers, buzzards and other birds of prey abound. If you take the boat to Lundy – it really is a must – between May and July you will see puffins, with their brightly colored beaks.

Bradt on Great Britain – our Slow Travel approach

Bradt’s coverage of parts of Britain makes ‘Slow Travel’ his focus. For us, Slow Travel means ditching the tourist lists – deciding not to try to see “too much” – and instead taking the time to really get into the shoes of a special region. You don’t have to travel at the speed of a snail: just allow yourself to savor the moment, appreciate the local differences that create a sense of place, and celebrate its food, people, and traditions. .

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Introducing North and Central Devon

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From relaxed village strolls to breathtaking coastal hikes.

From trailers to safari-style tents.

From luxury accommodations to simple, family-style shops.

From working farms to post houses.

From nature reserves to converted mansions.

Tissington Trail Peak District United Kingdom

Leave the car behind and explore Britain’s motorways, back roads and coastal paths on two wheels.

Whether you’re looking for a bench with a view or a grassy meadow with a stream, you can find it on Exmoor.

As well as their other treasures, North Devon and Exmoor boast exquisite churches.

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RHS Garden Rosemoor Travel Guide and Information https://vermonttravelguides.com/rhs-garden-rosemoor-travel-guide-and-information/ Mon, 16 May 2022 12:33:34 +0000 https://vermonttravelguides.com/rhs-garden-rosemoor-travel-guide-and-information/ The RHS’s flagship garden, Rosemoor, covers 65 acres and features 200 varieties of roses. And that’s just the beginning – there are every plant imaginable and every color in the spectrum. There are vegetables aplenty, red fruits, orchards and walks in the woods. It takes a while to see it properly; the highlights are all […]]]>

The RHS’s flagship garden, Rosemoor, covers 65 acres and features 200 varieties of roses. And that’s just the beginning – there are every plant imaginable and every color in the spectrum. There are vegetables aplenty, red fruits, orchards and walks in the woods. It takes a while to see it properly; the highlights are all accessible in about an hour, but if you can spend the day here, do so. Any visitor to Devon with an interest in flora will certainly not regret it.

Come here on a sunny day, any time of the year, and take your time to breathe in the scents and sights. Getting to know your fellow visitors can be daunting: on my last visit, a voice came up: “Did you tell dad about the pelargonium?” “. The child looked about five years old.

The RHS organizes daily events and exhibitions, as well as courses, and the reading room is open to non-members who can browse the 1,300 reference books. The award-winning Garden Kitchen serves hot meals (see opposite) while the Wisteria Tea Room, part of Lady Anne’s House, is open in summer.

Plant lovers must visit The Cool Garden, The Model Gardens, The Winter Garden and The Cherry Garden. Beyond the flora and fauna, visitors can wander the Bicentennial Arboretum or the Stumpery, a sculptural backdrop of gnarled tree branches and small stumps.

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